This Leopard Has Blue Encrusted Gemstones for Spots

Leopard Moth (Zeuzera pyrina) – I found the blue sparkling spots on this moths wings and head quite beautiful. It belongs to a family of moths called Cossidae, and this is one of only three species that can be found in the British Isles. It flies at night and is attracted to light, but it can also be found resting during the daytime on tree trunks. The adults are not able to feed. They fly June to July, and frequent open woodland, scrub, parks and gardens. The larvae feed on the wood of various deciduous trees.

Leopard Moth Zeuzera pyrina

Leopard Moth Zeuzera pyrina

Leopard Moth Zeuzera pyrina

Leopard Moth Zeuzera pyrina

Attracted to moth trap, rear garden, July 2018. Nikon D7200 Β© Peter Hillman.

48 thoughts on “This Leopard Has Blue Encrusted Gemstones for Spots

    1. Thank you, Liz πŸ™‚ I don’t really know how long they live for, but their main objective when adults is to mate and lay eggs. Sadly they will eventually starve to death, so I guess they have to get all their living in pretty quick!

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  1. I know I am not to take literally “gemstones for spots. But am I to take literally what you say: “The adults are not able to feed”? I would think they need some nourishment at least to reproduce. Very nice photos and I like you did detail shots of sections to show the gemstones.

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    1. The adults won’t live long and they will starve to death, so they have to get all their reproducing in very quickly. Thank you, David πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

      1. One for album, that’s for sure. We have had a dreadful year butterfly wise at our spot. I truly hope things improve when the warm weather returns.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Sorry about your butterfly numbers there. They haven’t been too bad here with the hot weather, so hopefully they will pick up your end when the weather gets better.

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  2. Amazing that a moth would be so startling in colour/wing pattern. Wouldn’t you think it would blend into its surroundings more to avoid predators. I’ve never seen anything remotely like it. Thanks for sharing, Pete.

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  3. And look at those legs! They sparkle, too. It’s just extraordinary. It does look for all the world as though it’s been decorated with blue glitter — but what a blue. I’m just speechless.

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  4. Incredible detail. Wow, I really love this one. I don’t think I’ve seen something similar here at all. Your photos are fabulous!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. What an extraordinary moth! I bet it truly embraces the concept of ‘Carpe Diem’ if eating is not on the agenda. Great title for this post too.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. So long as its ok with you Pete I might do a post on my first ‘colour’ day that features this beautiful Leopard Moth, probably I’d choose 2 photos from above. Easing back into colour posts again seems a fine excuse to use your lovely photos of this gorgeous creature!

    Liked by 1 person

      1. No problem, Liz! I only get the odd request to use images for educational rather than commercial use, which I usually agree to so long as folk name me as the photographer. If they help folk to undertsand and appreciate the natural world I am all for it! πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Well… I love your generosity in sharing your beautiful imagery in such a great cause. We’re both so fortunate to have nature all around us aren’t we? Its easy to forget its not the case for many… like the woman from Beijing who’d only ever seen gray sky that I reblogged about!

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