A Moth That Mimics A Leaf.

x2 images. Double click to enlarge. This is Angle Shades (Phlogophora meticulosa), and its is quite an extraordinary looking moth. Very distinctively shaped and patterned which make it resemble a withered leaf. It rests with its wings folded in an unusual fashion. It is often seen during the day resting on walls, fences and foliage.

200 Moths

I have just uploaded the 200th species of moth to A Nature Journey, and when you consider there are around 2,500 species in Great Britain that is but a drop in the ocean. Anyway, here are selection of moths, some you have seen before, and some perhaps you have not. If you wish to visit… Read More 200 Moths

Spotted Magpie

Anania coronata – This has to be one of my favourite micro-moths with its beautiful pearlescent markings. Another one that was attracted to the outside garage light, despite the continuing rain. Double-click image for a closer look. For further interest visit the ‘Moths’ page.

Small Quaker

Orthosia cruda – This is a common spring species here, so its flight time has now come and gone. This small moth has a plain appearance with light colouration, but has fairly distinct kidney-shaped markings on the forewings. Double-click image for a closer look. For further interest visit the ‘Moths’ page and also the ‘Noctuidae’… Read More Small Quaker

The Coronet

Craniophora ligustri – This is the first time I have seen this beautifully coloured and patterned moth. It appears to be a nice fresh specimen expressing olive hues, which I intially found resting on my garage wall. It is widely distributed across most of Britain, but it is not a common species. Double-click images for… Read More The Coronet

Pale Tussock

Calliteara pudibunda – This is an unusual moth as moths go, quite a bundle of fur which will happily sit on your finger for very long periods if you allowed it to. I have always thought it has quite a charming scientific name which kind of rolls off the tongue.

Another Carpet

Green Carpet (Colostygia pectinataria) – There are never enough green moths around. This is one of my favourites. © Peter Hillman ♦ 20th May 2020 ♦ Rear garden, South Staffordshire ♦ Nikon D7200

Common Carpet Moth

Epirrhoe alternata – And another moth that adores my garage light. This is a Geometer moth, so called because the caterpillar, called an inchworm, appears to measure the earth as it crawls along, arching and ‘looping’ its body. That is why they are also known as ‘loopers’. They are the 2nd largest family of macro-moths… Read More Common Carpet Moth

Azalea Leaf Miner

Caloptilia azaleella – This is a tiny moth which loves my garage light. There were a few hanging around it, mesmerised by its glow. It is a naturalised adventive species which is steadily spreading northwards, and was probably introduced with azalea and rhodedendron plants. It is around 5mm (1/4in) long, and I could barely see… Read More Azalea Leaf Miner

Brimstone Moth

Opisthograptis luteolata – Another insect mesmerised by the garage light. I find at least one of these in the morning, They are quite common at the moment. Double-click image to get closer. © Peter Hillman ♦ 10th May 2020 ♦ rear garden, South Staffordshire ♦ Nikon D7200

Green Long-horn

Adela reaumurella – This is a female … the males antennae are a lot, lot longer than hers – three times the length of the forewing! I found her basking in the sunshine, flashing her shiny scales. Double-click image to enlarge. © Peter Hillman ♦ 21st April 2020 ♦ Local woodland path, Staffordshire ♦ Nikon… Read More Green Long-horn

Clouded Border

Lomaspilis marginata – Yep … it’s a moth and not a butterfly, believe it or not. Quite a delicate looking moth with brown markings which can be quite variable. © Peter Hillman ♦ 19th July 2015 ♦ Back garden, Staffordshire ♦ Nikon D3200

Grey Dagger

Acronicta psi – This moth gets it name from the black dagger-like markings on its forewings. It is not possible to tell apart from the Dark Dagger (A. tridens), without genitalia dissection (which is not my thing) and is normally recorded as an aggregate species. It is found in most habitats, including woodland, hedgerows and… Read More Grey Dagger

Mottled Beauty

Alcis repandata – This was the one that nearly got away, but thankfully landed and rested on the side of the garden shed at the time. Quite an attractive moth beauty this, which can be extremely variable. A regular visitor to light sources. © Peter Hillman ♦14th June 2017 ♦ Back garden, Staffordshire ♦ Nikon… Read More Mottled Beauty

Oak Eggar

Lasiocampa quercus – I came across this striking hairy caterpillar as it crawled over a sea wall when I was on a visit to Llandudno, Wales. They do not feed on oak as the English name leads us to believe, but its cocoon looks much like an acorn. The hairs may cause skin irritation, which… Read More Oak Eggar

Brindled Pug

Eupithecia abbreviata – This attractive moth must have been bedazzled by my garage light and I found it on the door the next morning. Like most pugs they are only small with a wingspan of around 22mm (7/8in). It is an early spring species, and usually inhabits deciduous woodland where the caterpillars feed on oak… Read More Brindled Pug

Dark Arches

Apamea monoglypha – This moth really like your house lights, and you certainly know when one is around because they whiz around you like crazy. Yet they are mostly well behaved during the light of day and will let you photograph them wthout flying off, which is good because there would be no point in… Read More Dark Arches

Heart & Dart

Agrotis exclamationis – You can clearly see why they call this moth the Heart & Dart. Double-click for a closer look-see. Copyright: Peter HillmanCamera used: Nikon D7200Date taken: 29th June 2019Place: Attracted to moth trap, rear garden, Staffordshire

Two Fan-foots

At first glance these two fairly well-defined macro-moths from the family Erebidae – subfamily Herminiinae – look quite similar. But look more closely … see how their finely drawn lines are different? Double-click to peer closer … Copyright: Peter HillmanCamera used: Nikon D7200Date taken: 6th July 2019 & 29th June 2019Place: Attracted to moth trap,… Read More Two Fan-foots

Codling Moth

Cydia pomonella – Although the caterpillar of this small moth can be quite a pest to fruit trees, the adult has quite some fine detail over all, and a lovely coppery finish to the bottom end of the forewings. Double-click for a closer look. Copyright: Peter HillmanCamera used: Nikon D7200Date taken: 29th June 2019Place: Attracted… Read More Codling Moth

Orange Swift

Triodia sylvina – This is from a primitive moth group called Hepialidae, which contains just 5 species found in the British Isles. The adults cannot feed for they have no functional proboscis. The images featured are that of the male. The sexes look quite different from one another. Copyright: Peter HillmanCamera used: Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ38Date… Read More Orange Swift

Willow Ermine

Yponomeuta rorrella – These small moths can be a fair challenge to photograph because of their pale and reflective scales, so best done out of direct sunlight with the exposure turned down a couple of clicks. Copyright: Peter HillmanCamera used: Nikon D7200Date taken: 18th July 2019Place: Attracted to moth trap, rear garden, Staffordshire

Diamond-back Moth

Plutella xylostella – A very common micro-moth with a fairly distinct diamond pattern on its … well – its back. Double-click on images to get closer. Copyright: Peter HillmanCamera used: Nikon D7200Date taken: 6th July 2019Place: Attracted to moth trap, rear garden, Staffordshire

Wainscot Smudge

Ypsolopha scabrella – Quite an extraordinary looking little moth with distinctive raised tufts which can be seen when the moth is at rest. Copyright: Peter Hillman Camera used: Nikon D7200 Date taken: 20th July 2017 Place: Attracted to moth trap, rear garden, Staffordshire  

Garden Rose Tortrix

Acleris variegana – An extremely variable micro-moth species in patterning and colouration. A melanic form also occurs. Like other similar species of Tortrix, it mimics bird-droppings to evade predation. The larvae feed on the leaves of a variety of trees and shrubs, including roses, brambles, hawthorns, cherries and apples. Copyright: Peter Hillman Camera used: Nikon… Read More Garden Rose Tortrix

Old Lady

Mormo maura – You know when this one pays a visit because it is fairly large with a wingspan of up to 65mm (2 1/2in). Not one of the brightest of moths, but it has an interesting, fine-lined pattern. Copyright: Peter Hillman Camera used: Nikon D7200 Date taken: 26th August 2017 Place: Attracted to moth… Read More Old Lady

Ash-bark Knot-horn

Euzophera pinguis – Quite an unmistakable micro-moth with distinctive zig-zag markings. The larvae feed under the living bark of ash, which if becoming infested may kill the tree. This is a localised species in England. Copyright: Peter Hillman Camera used: Nikon D7200 Date taken: 20th July 2017 Place: Attracted to moth trap, rear garden, Staffordshire… Read More Ash-bark Knot-horn

Common Plume

Emmelina monodactyla – An odd-looking moth which often rests with its wings rolled tightly up. It is quite a weak flier, and will only travel a short distance before settling down again. Copyright: Peter Hillman Camera used: Nikon D7200 Date taken: 8th July 2017 Place: Attracted to moth trap, rear garden, Staffordshire  

Iron Prominent

Notodonta dromedarius – A moth which looks like it is suffering from oxidation with its distinct red rusty markings. One of the easier of the night lepidoptera to photograph. They are fairly calm and will remain still for a long time. Copyright: Peter Hillman Camera used: Nikon D7200 Date taken: 20th July 2017 Place: Attracted… Read More Iron Prominent

The Drinker

Euthrix potatoria – An unusual moth. This is the female of the species. The name comes from the habit of the caterpillar which apparently has a preference for drinking drops of dew. Copyright: Peter Hillman Camera used: Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ38 Date taken: 26th June 2011 Place: Attracted to moth trap, rear garden, Staffordshire  

Maiden’s Blush

Cyclophora punctaria – A finely detailed and beautifully coloured moth from the family Geometridae. Copyright: Peter Hillman Camera used: Nikon D7200 Date taken: 20th July 2017 Place: Attracted to moth trap, rear garden, Staffordshire  

Lunar Underwing

Omphaloscelis lunosa – There is a dark ‘crescent moon’ marking on the pale underwing of this moth which gives it its name. Copyright: Peter Hillman Camera used: Nikon D7200 Date taken: 23rd, 24th & 30th September 2017 Place: Attracted to moth trap, rear garden, Staffordshire