You Made My Day Today!

Robin Erithacus rubecula

Thanks to this little Robin who suddenly appeared and flew across my path to land in a tree nearby. I had gone for a walk in search of toadstools, but the ground is bone dry, almost like in the middle of summer, and although not completely fruitless, there were not many of them about. But on the last return leg of my walk this little darling bird appeared, and surely made my day 🙂

Shot with my macro lens, that is how close he or she was.

October 2017, local wood, Staffordshire, England.

On A Winter’s Day

Robin (Erithacus rubecula)

Photograph of  Robin (Erithacus rubecula), taken December 2016, local canal, Staffordshire. © Pete Hillman 2016. Camera used Nikon D7200, with Nikon 70-300mm telephoto zoom lens.

Singing His Little Heart Out

Robin (Erithacus rubecula)

Robin (Erithacus rubecula)

Robin (Erithacus rubecula)

Robin (Erithacus rubecula)

On this Christmas Eve I was fortunate enough to be treated to this lovely little chappies bird song from a tree at the bottom of my garden. It certainly was music to my ears.

Photographs of  Robin (Erithacus rubecula), taken December 2016, rear garden, Staffordshire. © Pete Hillman 2016. Camera used Nikon D7200, with Nikon 70-300mm telephoto zoom lens.

A Very Welcome Friend

Robin (Erithacus rubecula)

This afternoon the Robin has returned to my garden. He sat in a bush at the bottom and sang a little tune before flying off.

Robin (Erithacus rubecula)

Robin (Erithacus rubecula)

Robin (Erithacus rubecula)

Photographs of Robin (Erithacus rubecula) taken November 2016, front garden, Staffordshire. © Pete Hillman 2016. Camera used Nikon D7200, with Sigma 105mm macro lens.

More of Super Robin

Robin (Erithacus rubecula)

Art thou the bird whom Man loves best,
The pious bird with the scarlet breast,
Our little English Robin;
The bird that comes about our doors
When autumn winds are sobbing?

Verse from the poem “The Redbreast Chasing the Butterfly” written by William Wordsworth in 1802.

Robin (Erithacus rubecula)

Robin (Erithacus rubecula)

Robins have to be one of my favourite birds, and it’s not just because of their bright red breast and sweet bird song. I find their manner both fascinating and delightful, and I can’t help but smile when I see one. They appear to be such inquisitive birds by nature, and they get fairly close to you, and don’t appear to have any fear of you. Maybe, in their own way, they find us interesting, perhaps even fascinating.

Photographs of  Robin (Erithacus rubecula), taken September 2016, rear garden, Staffordshire. © Pete Hillman 2016. Camera used Nikon D7200, with Nikon 70-300mm telephoto zoom lens.

Super Robin!

Robin (Erithacus rubecula)

I was sitting in my garden earlier having some lunch, and I suddenly heard such sweet bird song coming from a nearby tree. It was very breezy, and amidst the cacophony of rustling leaves I managed to pinpoint the source of this delightful singing. And there, perched on a tree limb, was this most beautiful little Robin sporting his bright red breast.

Robin (Erithacus rubecula)

I have never seen a Robin jump before, on the spot. It suddenly leaped into the air a short distance, but clearing the branch it was perched upon, and settled back down in the same spot. It only did this once. I thought maybe it was the wind jostling the tree, but who really knows. I found it quite atsonishing.

Robin (Erithacus rubecula)

I observed the Robin for a fair length of time before it flew off and disappeared into a nearby bush. I have hardly seen any Robins this year, so to see this one and to listen to its sweet serenade, was a pure joy, and it sure made my day today!

Photographs of  Robin (Erithacus rubecula), taken September 2016, rear garden, Staffordshire. © Pete Hillman 2016. Camera used Nikon D7200, with Nikon 70-300mm telephoto zoom lens.

Robin

Erithacus rubecula

I find Robins always appear to be as curious about us as we are about them. They are probably one of the easiest birds to identify with its distinctive bright red breast. The juveniles lack the distinctive red breast to begin with, but they have streaked upper and underparts with crescent markings.

They feed on spiders, insects, worms, berries and seeds, and are common visitors to our bird tables. The nest is made of built up leaves and grass in a bank, thick hedge or bush, or dense ivy. The female lays 4-6 eggs in 2 broods from  April to August. They can live for up to 5 years.

Seen all year round, they can be found in all kinds of woodland, especially open woodland, and parks, gardens, and hedgerows. Common and widespread throughout.