Tortricidae

Rhyacionia pinicolana

Rhyacionia pinicolana

Torticidae is the largest and most diverse group of microlepidoptera with over 6,000 species worldwide, and up to 399 species in Britain belonging to the superfamily Tortricoidea. The caterpillars of these Tortrix moths live in rolled-up leaves or flowers held together with silken threads, hence they are know as “leafrollers”. This way they feed safely protected from predators. Some of these are considered serious pests in agriculture, horticulture and forestry, causing major damage to a wide variety of crops, including fruit of all kinds, tea and coffee, cereals and cotton. The Colding Moth, by example, causes serious damage to apples and pears, the larvae boring into and eating the fruit.

The moths featured in this post belong to the subfamily Olethreutinae.

Codling Moth Cydia pomonella

Codling Moth Cydia pomonella

Bud Moth Spilonota ocellana

Bud Moth Spilonota ocellana

Eudemis profundana

Eudemis profundana

Gypsonoma sociana

Gypsonoma sociana

Epiblema costipunctana

Epiblema costipunctana


All photographs taken in 2011, rear garden, Staffordshire, except for last image taken in local field. © Pete Hillman 2011.

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6 thoughts on “Tortricidae

    • Thank you, Sandy 🙂 I was amazed once I started photographing them in my backyard at how many there was, and how different many of them are. And how some even compete with butterflies for their beauty.

      Liked by 1 person

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