Autumn Brings Surprises


Harlequin Ladybird (Harmonia axyridis forma spectabilis) – As the land prepares for the winter slumber with October bedding in, the milder weather is keeping some indviduals away from their hibernation. It almost appears like spring has come early, with some spring flowering plants bursting into bloom. The world is so confused in more ways than one.



32 thoughts on “Autumn Brings Surprises

  1. What a pretty lady! In the past couple of decades we’ve seen a veritable invasion of Asian ladybird beetles in Minnesota, with many more black spots than our natives, and they’re crowding the natives out. And they can bite!

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    1. She is a pretty lady. Same problem here with them as a non-native species bullying the locals. But to be fair I still see plenty of the natives around.

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  2. So true, we are all living in a rather confused world right now while we are fortunately still allowed to take part in the amazing world of insects. Thank you for sharing this great images of this unique lady.

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  3. I’ve never seen one of these, with so much black. What I have noticed this year is a predominance of ‘spotless’ lady beetles: a pure, pretty red without spots. I finally looked them up this morning, and think they might be the genus Cycloneda . In the process of looking, I found a page showing what has to be an almost complete collection of Texas species — I had no idea there were so many!

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    1. I don’t believe we have a spotless red ladybird over here, so that sounds quite fascinating to have one there on your side of the pond. I Googled Cycloneda and they are quite something, aren’t they?

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  4. Nice as they look, we too are having similar issues with these ”foreigners” which are apparently causing problems for the ‘locals’, and of course they have no problems with Passport Control either!

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  5. I’ve not seen ladybirds like that before. Ours are usually red. They are beauties. Thank you so much for sharing – you bring a lot of sunshine to my day. Still unable to get out because of the wildfires. Enjoying your view instead πŸ™‚

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    1. Sorry to know the wildfires are still going over there. I hope you are safe and well away from them. Thank you for your lovely words. I am pleased you liked the ladybird colours so πŸ™‚ Stay safe and keep well.

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      1. We are 31 miles away from the closest fire, but the mountains behind us hold the smoke and keep it from moving elsewhere. Fortunately, it is getting cooler but the winds have actually made the fires harder to control. Your photos are such a blessing, seriously! I haven’t been out in nature since the start of Covid-19. It is nice to go outdoors, even if it is virtually.

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  6. Cute ladybug… I’m not seeing our usual congregations of the Asian variety on the sides of the house and tucked into the woodshed. It may still be early, as it has been mild so far, though.
    It is always unsettling when things bloom out of season.

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  7. Weatherwise, one might thing we are in the dead of winter instead of well into spring!This ladybird is very pretty indeed and so if the warmer weather remains a little longer where you are, it will provide greater opportunities to see them – for a while.

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  8. I see from Wikipedia that this species is one of the most variable in the world. I’ve also occasionally come across other insects that have harlequin in their common name.

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    1. I have seen all three forms here, and it is indeed a very variable insect. Although an invader I still find the colours and patterns cheerful.

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  9. That’s a handsome lady beetle, Pete. We usually are seeing them massing on the sides of white or brightly colored houses about now to stay warm and in some instances find their way indoors to overwinter. So far that isn’t happening. There are others such as stink bugs and leaf-footed bugs but most are not doing their thing yet either.

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