Wall Lizard Podarcis muralis


Class Reptilia » Order Squamata » Family Lacertidae » Species Podarcis muralis (Laurenti, 1768)


Wall Lizard Podarcis muralis
Green-backed form basking on seafront wall, Bournemouth, Dorset.
1st August 2016. © Peter Hillman
Wall Lizard Podarcis muralis
Green-backed form basking on seafront wall, Bournemouth, Dorset.
1st August 2016. © Peter Hillman

There are two forms of Wall Lizard, the brown-backed form and the green-backed form. A medium-sized lizard which exhibits a mottled pattern along the flanks, it is very agile, and compared to native species of lizard, it can be seen running up vertical faces of walls or rock surfaces.


Length up to 20 cm long including tail.

The Wall Lizard emerges from hibernation in spring and begins breeding. The female lays several clutches of around 8 eggs, in sandy soil or under rocks, from May to July. They will hatch from July to September. It can live 7-10 years.

It will hunt and eat all kinds of invertebrates, from spiders, woodlice and grasshoppers, to flies and moths, to name but a few. They will also eat fruits and berries when they come across them.

Seen March to October, but may also be seen during the winter months drawn from hibernation by warmer weather. Inhabiting only a few coastal sites, it is often associated with man-made structures, especially stone walls. It is also found on cliff faces, often basking in the sun.

Presumed to be an introduced species to mainland Britain, where it is native to Jersey in the Channel Isles. The green-backed form is said to originate in Italy.