On Dead Wood

Hairy Curtain Crust (Stereum hirsutum)

I come across this bracket fungus quite often in my local woods growing on dead tree trunks or branches. Touching it, it feels quite hard and resilient, a bit like tough hide. I believe it’s called Hairy Curtain Crust (Stereum hirsutum), named because it has a hairy, almost velvet like appearance. It can appear in many colour forms.

Hairy Curtain Crust (Stereum hirsutum)

Photograph of Hairy Curtain Crust (Stereum hirsutum), taken September 2016, local wood, Staffordshire. © Pete Hillman 2016. Camera used Nikon D7200, with Sigma 105mm macro lens.

Hairy Curtain Crust

Stereum hirsutum

Hairy Curtain Crust (Stereum hirsutum)

Also called ‘Hairy Stereum’, this is a variable coloured, fan-shaped bracket fungus with pale margins, the upper surface being distinctly hairy. It is often seen with bands of green algae. Fruit body up to 7cm wide.

Hairy Curtain Crust (Stereum hirsutum)

It fruits summer to autumn, and grows on old stumps of deciduous trees, especially those of oak, beech and birch, forming tiers upon tiers. Also found on fallen branches and logs. Common and widespread.

Hairy Curtain Crust (Stereum hirsutum)

Photographs of Hairy Curtain Crust (Stereum hirsutum) taken August 2007, local wood, Staffordshire. © Pete Hillman 2007. Camera used Sony Cyber-shot DSC-W1.