The Strange


Heterotoma planicornis – I always think the early stage of true bugs look kind of strange, and this nymph is no exception. The adults grow up to around 5mm (just under a 1/4in) long, and they look quite strange, too. See last image. Double-click image to enlarge.

Heterotoma planicornis nymph

Heterotoma planicornis

© Peter Hillman ♦ 30th June 2019 ♦ Rear garden, Staffordshire ♦ Nikon D7200


‘Bugs’ Bunny

Heterotoma planicornis

No, not a rabbit or a strange Frankenstein hybrid between bunny and bug, but just a bug, a true bug from the order of insects called Hemiptera.

Heterotoma planicornis

I know one thing this small bug likes to do, and that is to wave his extraordinarily long antennae around. Here, there and everywhere.

Heterotoma planicornis

Heterotoma planicornis

Heterotoma planicornis

Heterotoma planicornis


Please click on an image for a larger more detailed view. Clicking a second time may get you a little closer.


Rear garden, Staffordshire, England. July 2017.

Heterotoma planicornis

The weird and wonderful image above is the nymph stage of a plant bug called Heterotoma planicornis. This little fella will grow up big and strong and will look like the big fella in the image below which I took last year.

Heterotoma planicornis

They grow up to 5mm (0.2in) long, and the adults and nymphs feed on other insects and plant tissue.


Rear garden, Staffordshire, England. July 2016 and June 2017.

 

The Weird And The Wonderful

It’s amazing what you see when you just stop and look, and look some more. This is a tiny plant bug which has no common name, but is called Heterotoma planicornis. They grow to just over 5mm long, and it was a wonder I saw it on a leaf of my crab apple tree. It moved so fast from leaf to leaf it was hard to keep track of, let alone photograph it. The wide and flattened 2nd antennal segment, darkish ground colour and green legs help in identifying the species.

The adults and nymphs feed on small insects as well as plant tissue.

The adults are seen July to October on a variety of plants and trees, especially nettles. It is abundant throughout most of Britain.