Garden Peony


I have always been around peonies. My mom and dad grew them, and I grow them now … well I just let them get on with the growing. This is a double peony, and it is newly blossoming. I liked the way the morning light had caught it, and tried to capture it just as it was in that moment. I tidied a few distractions up with the patch and clone tools in my photo editor, and added just a little high pass sharpening. Sometimes less is better. Double-click image to enlarge.


Peony

© Peter Hillman ♦ 6th May 2020 ♦ rear garden, South Staffordshire ♦ Nikon D7200


Glory-of-the-snow


Scilla forbesii – A bit late for this one really, as the flowering period is now over. But one of the early spring flowering bulbs. Double-click to enlarge image.


Glory-of-the-snow Scilla forbesii

© Peter Hillman ♦ 27th March 2020 ♦ Front garden, South Staffordshire ♦ Nikon D7200


White Campion


Silene latifolia – This is one of my favourite wild flowers, and it is always a pleasure to see on my walks. According to fossil records it was introduced to Britain during the Bronze Age. It flowers between May and October across much of Britain, except the far north and west.


White Campion Silene latifolia


Copyright: Peter Hillman
Camera used: Nikon D7200
Date taken: 7th July 2019
Place: Local woodland ride, Staffordshire


 

Like Ornamental Glass

Geranium

This is a hardy Geranium after rain, one of the few remaining flowers left in the garden as autumn deepens. The flower is so delicate and refined with those shimmering raindrops it is like it is made from the finest glass.

This can be quite tricky to photograph. Besides the lighting conditions, it all depends on where you focus as the depth of field can go anywhere. I always use manual mode for full control, and take several photos, picking the one which I think works the best.  I tried to keep it soft on the side edges, ensuring the background was completely blurred. This makes the flower and its details pop more, especially if you can tone down the back lighting, too.

Double click if you wanna get closer…

October 2019 © Pete Hillman.

End of Season Flowers

Water Mint Mentha aquatica

The Water Mint (Mentha aquatica) has gone mad again this year, spreading its roots and sprouting throughout the garden pond. Yet its sweet sugary goodness attracts many insects, so it is always good in that respect. This is one of the last blooms which I wanted to try and capture before they all disappeared with the advance of autumn.

September 2019 © Pete Hillman.

Looking Differently

Petunia

As you know I like to get close to things, and I chose a Petunia which has been growing in one of my containers on the patio for this one. I was so attracted to its deep rich colours and the intricate veins spreading through the petals like ink stains on blotting paper.

Rear garden. September 2019 © Pete Hillman.

Delicate

Dog Rose Rosa canina

It is always a joy to see the Dog Rose Rosa canina on my walks through the local woods. It is a sign that summer is not too far away.

Click and click again on the image to get that little bit closer …


June 2019, local woodland margin, Staffordshire, England. © Pete Hillman.

Rain Again

Pencilled Cranes-bill Geranium versicolor

Click and click again on the image to get that little bit closer …


Hardy geranium. June 2019, rear garden, Staffordshire, England. © Pete Hillman.

A Drenched Beauty

This is one of the best years for peonies I have known here. I do love the rain so long it doesn’t pour endlessly, and this morning it was but a brief spell. I love the freshness and invigoration it brings to the garden, so I couldn’t resist popping out with my camera when the rain had stopped.

The flowers were heavy with the raindrops, looking almost as if they were bowing. I have a special place for Peonies. My parents grew them back home, and they remind me of my younger years growing up, and so enjoying those warm sunny spring days.


May 2019, rear garden, Staffordshire, England. © Pete Hillman.

Butterflies And Lavender

Gatekeeper Pyronia tithonus

I have three Lavender bushes in my small garden, and the bees and butterflies really enjoy visiting them. Next year I may consider planting a lavender hedge, if I can make room for one. This butterfly with the twin spots is called the Gatekeeper (Pyronia tithonus).

Gatekeeper Pyronia tithonus

Gatekeeper Pyronia tithonus

Click once to expand view, click again to get that little bit closer


July 2018, rear garden, Staffordshire, England. © Pete Hillman.

Meadowsweet

Meadowsweet Filipendula ulmaria

On a stroll around Derwentwater I saw drifts of this most beautiful flower Meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria). It was even growing amongst the rocks on the shoreline. It is a member of the rose family Rosaceae, and it thrives in wet and damp places. It is commonly found in damp meadows and has a very sweet fragrance, hence its name.

Meadowsweet Filipendula ulmaria

July 2018, Derwentwater, Keswick, Cumbria, England. © Pete Hillman.

Catching The Early Sunlight

Opium Poppy Papaver somniferum

Last night was a very hot and close one, so sleep was quite restless. So up early to find this Opium Poppy (Papaver somniferum) flower catching the first rays of sunlight.

Opium Poppy Papaver somniferum

Click once to expand view, click again to get that little bit closer


June 2018, rear garden, Staffordshire, England. © Pete Hillman.

Opening Mid-summer II

Opium Poppy Papaver somniferum

Opium Poppy Papaver somniferum

Now if this plant grows feet and start walking about the garden I will be worried. There has been no meteor showers of late, has there? Although it does look like it is about to ballet dance around the flowerbed to me.

Click once to expand view, click again to get that little bit closer


Opium Poppy (Papaver somniferum) June 2018, rear garden, Staffordshire, England. © Pete Hillman.

Opening Mid-summer

Opium Poppy Papaver somniferum

Every few years (actually quite a few numbers of years can pass) and one of these beautiful Opium Poppies (Papaver somniferum) will just appear out of nowhere in my back garden. This one is quite a monster in size and has many heads like the mythical Hydra.

Click once to expand view, click again to get that little bit closer


June 2018, rear garden, Staffordshire, England. © Pete Hillman.

Wild Radish Raphanus raphanistrum

Wild Radish Raphanus raphanistrum

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June 2018, local field, Staffordshire, England. © Pete Hillman.

White Clover Trifolium repens

White Clover Trifolium repens

White Clover Trifolium repens

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June 2018, local field, Staffordshire, England. © Pete Hillman.

Gemander Speedwell Veronica chamaedrys

Gemander Speedwell Veronica chamaedrys

This small, low-growing plant always catches my eye, and I just have to stop to admire it.


May 2018, Stourport-on-Severn, Worcestershire, England. © Pete Hillman

Scarlet Pimpernel Anagallis arvensis

Scarlet Pimpernel Anagallis arvensis

One of my very favourite wild flowers, this is such a small, low-growing flower it could quite easily be overlooked if it wasn’t for its bright red vivid colour. Definitely a hands and knees job in the dirt to get these shots in.

Scarlet Pimpernel Anagallis arvensis

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June 2018, local field, Staffordshire, England. © Pete Hillman.

Red Clover Trifolium pratense

Red Clover Trifolium pratense

One of the many delights to be found in a wild flower meadow.

Red Clover Trifolium pratense

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May 2018, local field, Staffordshire, England. © Pete Hillman. Sigma 18-300mm lens.

Finally, After 3 Years …

Yellow Flag Iris Iris pseudacorus

After 3 years since I built my small garden pond and planted this Yellow Flag Iris Iris pseudacorus it has flowered for the very first time to my joy. This is the first bloom, and it looks like there are many more to come.

Yellow Flag Iris Iris pseudacorus

Yellow Flag Iris Iris pseudacorus

Yellow Flag Iris Iris pseudacorus

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May 2018, garden pond, rear garden, Staffordshire, England. © Pete Hillman Sigma 18-300mm.

One of The Speedwells

Speedwell

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This is such a lovely little plant and I always enjoy spotting it in the fields. It is one of the Speedwells, which one it is I don’t know.

May 2018, local field, Staffordshire, England. © Pete Hillman. Sigma 18-300mm lens.

 

A Tiny Cup To Catch The Light

Meadow Buttercup Ranunculus acris

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Meadow Buttercup Ranunculus acris, May 2018, local field, Staffordshire, England. © Pete Hillman. Sigma 18-300mm lens.

From The Fields

Common Vetch Vicia sativa

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Playing in the fields this afternoon with my new toy, Sigma 18mm-300mm macro lens. Down in the field on such a beautiful sunny day and no muddy knees for a change. Quite pleased with how versatile this lens is, and quite sharp with some nice bokeh when zoomed fully out and getting close in for macro.


One of my favourite wild flowers, Common Vetch (Vicia sativa). May 2018, local field, Staffordshire, England. © Pete Hillman