Philodromus aureolus

Philodromus aureolus

I believe this is the male of this species of crab spider which has a wonderful purplish sheen to it.


Please click on the image for a larger more detailed view.


Philodromus aureolus, rear garden, Staffordshire, England. May 2017.

Philodromus II

Philodromus sp

Another Philodromus sp. of Crab Spider on my Spotted Laurel which I spotted yesterday afternoon. The competition seems to be hotting up!

Onto Sweeter Things

Goldenrod Spider Misumena vatia

Now this crab spider is on the flowers of the Spotted Laurel. Please click image for a larger, more detailed view.


Goldenrod Spider (Misumena vatia), rear garden, Staffordshire, April 2017.

Ozyptila praticola

Ozyptila praticola

A reddish-brown species of Thomisidae which has fairly distinctive patternation, except in the females. Body length up to 4mm.

It feeds on other invertebrates.

The adults are seen primarily in spring and summer, but may be seen throughout the year. Found in various habitats, including woodland, hedgerows, parks and gardens. It can be found under bark, on moss, leaf detritus, low vegetation and on trees and shrubs. Common and widespread in the south, scarcer elsewhere.

Photograph of Ozyptila praticola taken May 2014, rear garden, Staffordshire. © Pete Hillman 2014. Camera used Nikon D7300, with Sigma 105mm macro lens.

Well Anchored

Goldenrod Spider (Misumena vatia)

In these photographs you can see how this crab spider has anchored itself to the surface with silk to secure itself.

Goldenrod Spider (Misumena vatia)

Photograph of Goldenrod Spider (Misumena vatia) taken October 2016, rear garden, Staffordshire. © Pete Hillman 2016. Camera used Nikon D7200, with Sigma 105mm macro lens. ISO 100. f/9. 1/200 sec.

On The Level

Goldenrod Spider (Misumena vatia)

When clearing some plants ready for the autumn and winter, I discovered this little crab spider which camouflages itself to blend in with the colour and pattern of flower petals. Any unsuspecting fly or even bee which happens upon the blossom will get a nasty shock as this spider will suddenly snatch it with its long front legs and then will begin devouring it.

Goldenrod Spider (Misumena vatia)

I now prefer taking these sort of photographs where you have a pale subject in direct sunshine in ‘manual’ mode, as this gives me more control over the light to avoid over exposure and blowing out of the highlights. I kept the ISO at 100, the aperture was f/9, and I increased the speed to 1/200 sec, which appeared to give me a balance I was happy with. These were taken hand-held, no flash was required.

Goldenrod Spider (Misumena vatia)

Photograph of Goldenrod Spider (Misumena vatia) taken October 2016, rear garden, Staffordshire. © Pete Hillman 2016. Camera used Nikon D7200, with Sigma 105mm macro lens.