Time Flies By


The windows have become like tv screens as the season roll by displaying all their wonders. These are amongst the last photos I have taken since becoming ill which was back in the autumn of 2019. Where did autumn go …? Winter arrived and how fast January went by, eh?  Spring feels like it is just around the corner, and it will be here before we know it. Spring is my favourite season, and whilst I look forward to it, it all seems to fly by so very quickly.


Autumn Leaves


Autumn


Autumn


Copyright: Peter Hillman
Camera used: Nikon D7200
Date taken: 20th & 22nd  October 2019
Place: Local woodland, Staffordshire


 

Autumn Winds

Autumn Winds

Whilst out in the local beech woods on Sunday morning I wanted to try and capture not only the autumnal colours but also the movement of the leaves to express how windy these past days have been due to a storm system crossing the country. I used a slow camera speed to try an capture the flutter of leaves in the cool October wind. I know this kind of contradicts what we try and do in photography, which is to attempt to capture the world perfectly still, between bouts of wind, but I thought I would just run with it, go with the flow of the wind and see where it took me 🙂

October 2017, Staffordshire, England.

Spinning Autumn

Garden Spider Araneus diadematus female

Garden Spider Araneus diadematus female

Garden Spider (Araneus diadematus) female, September 2017, rear garden, Staffordshire, England.

Autumn Light And Oak Leaf Magic

Oak Leaves

Walking by the river early yesterday morning, I was so taken by the autumn sun and how it filtered through the autumn oak leaves.

Oak Leaf

Oak Leaf

Photographs taken November 2016, local river bank, Staffordshire. © Pete Hillman 2016. Camera used Nikon D7200, with Sigma 105mm macro lens.

The Leaves Are Rusting

cotoneaster

cotoneaster

cotoneaster

Photographs of Cotoneaster taken November 2016, front garden, Staffordshire. © Pete Hillman 2016. Camera used Nikon D7200, with Sigma 105mm macro lens.

Down But Not Quite Out

Autumn Leaves

These Sweet Chestnut leaves are now fallen but no less beautiful as they form a drift beneath the tree, catching the morning sunlight and accentuating their form and detail. They will gradually disappear over time as fungi break them down, or earthworms will tug them down into their subterranean burrows to use as food.

Like all living organisms, including ourselves, from nature they come, and back to nature they go.

Photograph taken November 2016, local wood, Staffordshire. © Pete Hillman 2016. Camera used Nikon D7200, with Nikon 18-55mm lens.

Autumn Silhouette

Autumn Silhouette

I am always attracted to how sunlight shines through leaves, and this fallen maple leaf is one of those examples. But here I had the added bonus of a fly which had landed on the other side of the leaf, giving me its silhoutte.

Photograph taken November 2016, local park, Staffordshire. © Pete Hillman 2016. Camera used Nikon D7200, with Nikon 18-55mm lens.

Chestnuts In The Rain

sweet-chestnut-castanea-sativa-fruit

Photograph of Sweet Chestnut (Castanea sativa) fruit taken October 2016, local wood, Staffordshire. © Pete Hillman 2016. Camera used Nikon D7200, with Sigma 105mm macro lens. ISO 500. 1/80 sec. f/7.1.

October Hues

Sedum

I have grown autumn flowering sedum for many years now, and I am always happy to see it blazing in its full colour.

Photograph of Sedum taken October 2016, front garden, Staffordshire. © Pete Hillman 2016. Camera used Nikon D7200, with Sigma 105mm macro lens. ISO 1000. 1/100 sec. f/13. No flash, hand-held.

Autumn Air Still Buzzing

Eristalis intricarius

On my walk to the local Beech wood this afternoon I passed some ivy in bloom on a roadside verge, and was quite amazed at how many hoverflies were busying themselves feeding of the sweet nectar and pollen.

I was also taken how the autumn sunlight appeared to make their colours richer.

Eristalis intricarius

They were that busy hovering around from flower to flower they were quite tricky to photograph.

Eristalis intricarius


Drone Fly Eristalis tenax. Local roadside verge, Staffordshire, England. October 2016.

Super Robin!

Robin (Erithacus rubecula)

I was sitting in my garden earlier having some lunch, and I suddenly heard such sweet bird song coming from a nearby tree. It was very breezy, and amidst the cacophony of rustling leaves I managed to pinpoint the source of this delightful singing. And there, perched on a tree limb, was this most beautiful little Robin sporting his bright red breast.

Robin (Erithacus rubecula)

I have never seen a Robin jump before, on the spot. It suddenly leaped into the air a short distance, but clearing the branch it was perched upon, and settled back down in the same spot. It only did this once. I thought maybe it was the wind jostling the tree, but who really knows. I found it quite atsonishing.

Robin (Erithacus rubecula)

I observed the Robin for a fair length of time before it flew off and disappeared into a nearby bush. I have hardly seen any Robins this year, so to see this one and to listen to its sweet serenade, was a pure joy, and it sure made my day today!

Photographs of  Robin (Erithacus rubecula), taken September 2016, rear garden, Staffordshire. © Pete Hillman 2016. Camera used Nikon D7200, with Nikon 70-300mm telephoto zoom lens.

Autumn Around The Corner

Pyracantha

The berries on my Pyracantha are have been ripening well, and they remind me that autumn is not all that far away.

Photograph of Pyracantha berries, taken August 2016, front garden , Staffordshire. © Pete Hillman 2016. Camera used Nikon D3200, with Sigma 105mm macro lens with softbox flash diffuser.