Order Trichoptera: The Caddisflies


Also called ‘sedges’ or ‘sedge flies’, caddisflies are often mistaken for moths, and are often caught in moth traps. Belonging to the order of insects called Trichoptera, this group of insects are often overlooked for their dull appearance, yet they are most interesting, and some can be quite beautiful in their own way. There are about 7000 species worldwide, and 198 in Britain. Fossils of Caddisflies have been found as far back as the Cretaceous, and maybe the Jurassic, which may have been an ancestor of Trichoptera and Lepidoptera.

Caddisflies breed and live in and around freshwater habitats like streams, rivers and ponds. The adults are mainly seen by the human population in gardens, attracted to bright lights, or caught in moth traps, which suggests they are nocturnal. They are medium-sized insects bristling with hairs, which hold their wings close to the body in a tent like fashion. They have very long antennae. The larvae are well-known to fishermen when fly-fishing. They are aquatic with gills for breathing underwater, and most live in a protective case made from all kinds of natural materials like vegetation, gravel and sand, and even mollusc shells. Some live in silk tubes They live under rocks or amongst weed beneath the water. They go through various stages and when they molt they have to build a new case. Trichoptera have biting mouth parts, whilst some are strict herbivores eating only plant material, others are carnivores or omnivores.

They hold an important place and play a vital role in the environment of these freshwater habitats, where they provide food for fish and birds.

Caddisflies can be very hard to identify as many look similar and require microscopic scrutiny regards to wing venation and genitalia to mark the differences which aid in identifying individual species.


Family Limnephilidae


Cinnamon Sedge (Limnephilus lunatus)
Cinnamon Sedge
(Limnephilus lunatus)
Potamophylax sp.
Potamophylax sp.
Limnephilus auricula
Limnephilus auricula
Caperer Caddis Fly Halesus radiatus
Caperer Caddis Fly
(Halesus radiatus)
Limnephilus flavicornis
Limnephilus flavicornis
Limnephilidae sp.
Limnephilidae sp.
Mottled Sedge Glyphotaelius pellucidus
Mottled Sedge
(Glyphotaelius pellucidus)
Limnephilus marmoratus
Limnephilus marmoratus

Family Leptoceridae


Leptocerus tineiformis
Leptocerus tineiformis
Grousewing (Mystacides longicornis)
Grousewing
(Mystacides longicornis)
Longhorn (Oecetis ochracea)
Longhorn
(Oecetis ochracea)

Family Psychomyiidae


Tinodes sp.
Tinodes sp.

Family Hydropsychidae: Net-spinning Caddisflies


Hydropsyche sp.
Hydropsyche sp.
Hydropsyche contubernalis
Hydropsyche sp.
Hydropsyche sp.

Family Sericostomatidae


Welshman's Button Sericostoma personatum
Welshman’s Button
(Sericostoma personatum)

Family Hydroptilidae: Microcaddisflies


Hydroptilidae sp.
Hydroptilidae sp.

For further reference and with help and thanks for confirming identifcation of some challenging species see the links below.

The Riverfly Recording Schemes – for Caddisflies, Mayflies and Stoneflies – The Riverfly Recording Schemes , established by the Caddisfly, Mayfly and Stonefly Recording Scheme Officers, celebrates and exploits the common ground that exists between the three groups of flies. Although retaining their individual identity, the recording schemes are increasingly working together.

Facebook Trichoptera Research Group – Post questions, photos, and create events for Trichoptera Research Group. We anticipate that this group will aid discussion on the systematics, ecology, behavior, biology, and applied aspects of Trichoptera research and build a sense of community among Trichoptera researchers.

iRecord – iRecord is a website for sharing wildlife observations, including associated photos – you can register quickly and for free. Once you’ve registered, you can add your own biological records for other to see, and you can see what has been recorded by others. The goal of iRecord is to make it easier for wildlife sightings to be collated, checked by experts and made available to support research and decision-making at local and national levels.

NBN Atlas – The NBN (National Biodiversity Network) Atlas is an online tool that provides a platform to engage, educate and inform people about the natural world. It will help improve biodiversity knowledge, open up research possibilities and change the way environmental management is carried out in the UK.


An FSC publication The adult Trichoptera (caddisflies) of Britain and Ireland is also a very useful source and key.