Dryad’s Saddle Polyporus squamosus


Dryad's Saddle Polyporus squamosus
Canal towpath, South Staffordshire, England. 21st July 2020. © Peter Hillman

A dryad is a mythical wood-nymph, and this large bracket does indeed look like a seat or ‘saddle’ made for a woodland fairy. An impressively large and attractive annual bracket fungus, circular or fan-shaped, ochraceous-cream covered in concentric dark brown fibrillose scales. The tubes and pores are large and honeycomb-like, irregularly oval, white in colour to begin with, turning yellow as the bracket matures. The stem is dark brown and woody.

Cap size: up to 60 cm across, up to 5 cm thick


When Seen

Spring to early autumn.


Habitat & Host

Deciduous woodland, parks and gardens. A parasitic species which attacks and grows in tiers on the trunks of broad-leaved trees like sycamore, willow, poplar, beech and walnut. It can also occur on fallen trunks and large branches, where it becomes saprobic, feeding on the dying or dead and rotting wood.


Status & Distribution

Common and widespread throughout Britain. A native species.


Classification

….Class: Agaricomycetes
…….Order: Polyporales – Polypores
……….Family: Polyporaceae – Brackets
………….Genus: Polyporus
……………Scientific name: Polyporus squamosus (Huds.) Fr.


Photo Gallery

Dryad's Saddle Polyporus squamosus
Canal towpath, South Staffordshire, England. 21st July 2020. © Peter Hillman
Dryad's Saddle Polyporus squamosus
Canal towpath, South Staffordshire, England. 21st July 2020. © Peter Hillman