Otherside of The Sturgeon Moon


Last night I spotted the moon low on the horizon and noticed how large and red it was. I missed the full moon of August a few days ago, and according to the Old Farmer’s Almanac, it is sometimes known as the Sturgeon Moon, the name likely given by both colonists and Algonquian-speaking people in northeastern North America, as sturgeon are native to both Europe and the Americas.


Sturgeon Moon Waxing Gibbous

Waxing Gibbous Moon


It’s a wonder to think that when I look upon the glowing, ethereal face of the moon in awe, people from the past and ancient times looked upon that same glowing, ethereal face with the same feeling; and the present and the past are then the same moment.


Waxing Gibbous Moon

© Peter Hillman ♦ 4th April 2020 ♦ From rear garden, Staffordshire ♦ Nikon D7200


Supermoon #2

Supermoon

Higher in the sky now, and appearing a tad smaller than when it was rising, and more like its usual colour. So what really is a ‘supermoon’? This moon is not only the biggest and brightest supermoon of the year, but it is the closest supermoon since 26th January 1948, almost 69 years ago. I hope you got or get to see it. If not you will have to wait 18 years to see the next one on 25th November 2034.

Photograph taken November 2016, Staffordshire. © Pete Hillman 2016. Camera used Nikon D7200, with Nikon 70-300mm telephoto zoom lens.

Supermoon

Supermoon

I was lucky to catch site of this ‘Supermoon’ as the clouds parted. I caught it as it was just rising low on the horizon, and as the sun was slipping down on the opposite side of the planet, hence this odd colour. Not as sharp as I would have liked it, but the clouds were coming again.

Photograph taken November 2016, Staffordshire. © Pete Hillman 2016. Camera used Nikon D7200, with Nikon 70-300mm telephoto zoom lens.