Coral Slime Ceratiomyxa fruticulosa


Coral Slime Ceratiomyxa fruticulosa

Whilst initially looking like ice crystals or coral, it is actually a slime mould – which is not a fungi but belongs to the kingdom Protozoa – single-celled organisms.


Coral Slime Ceratiomyxa fruticulosa

This colony was found covering a large area of a fallen and decaying tree trunk.


Coral Slime Ceratiomyxa fruticulosa

Although many slime mold species fruit on wood they do not form a penetrating and absorptive mass of hyphae in the wood substrate, but form structures called plasmodia which are naked (without cell walls) masses of protoplasm which can move and engulf particles of food in an amoeboid manner. Slime mold plasmodia creep about over the surfaces of materials, engulfing bacteria, spores of fungi and plants, protozoa, and particles of nonliving organic matter. At some point, plasmodia convert into spore-bearing structures.


Coral Slime Ceratiomyxa fruticulosa

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36 thoughts on “Coral Slime Ceratiomyxa fruticulosa

  1. This is something brand new for me to see – and it looks attractive in your photographs too. Nonetheless, there is something sinister in your description of it creeping “about over the surfaces of materials, engulfing bacteria, spores of fungi and plants, protozoa, and particles of nonliving organic matter.”

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I have to admit it is kind of creepy and almost horror/sci fi movie stuff. But that’s how nature breaks down the dead at the same time sustains the living πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Gary. I hadn’t got my Raynox or my flash unit with me (I know, it’s a crime), as I was out looking for fungi, so was pleased to get the detail I got in the end.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Anki πŸ™‚ I had never seen anything like it before, and it looked like early morning frost, so quite an interesting find for me.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Apparently I am not the only one who is enthusiastic about slime. πŸ™‚ I found a couple of nice slimy examples (misnamed as they really are not slimy at all…at least most are not…several years ago. Mostly I run into the less intricate Fuligo septica. The species you’ve shared here is quite lovely if one is of a mind to examine it closely enough. That’s an awesome colony.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I read about this one, but I never saw it. I think it must be the most beautiful slime mould! Excellent pictures! I saw two different slime moulds lately, strange ones (I didn’t think of Amoebozoa at all) and not so nice, but interesting too. What a fascinating world, isn’t it?

    Liked by 1 person

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