Self Isolating


Sonronius dahlbomi – Like others around the world I am having to self isolate here because of the Coronavirus. I draw an interesting parallel to these tiny leafhopper bugs. Over the years I have come across these brightly coloured bugs (they are only about 5mm (3/16in) long) on a narrow woodland path and always in one particular spot amongst fern and nettle. I see them nowhere else. It is an uncommon species and localised, and found mainly in woodland in central and southern England.

I have had online discussions with an expert on these insects and he too has found that this particular species always seems to appear in a tight-knit cluster and does not develop out from it, which is a bit of a mystery. Perhaps they feel safe and content where they are, and they have everything they need in their confined living space to survive, and will only move if threatened to do so. The bottom two images show the early juvenile stage. You may want to double-click for a closer look.


Sonronius dahlbomi

Sonronius dahlbomi

Sonronius dahlbomi

Sonronius dahlbomi nymph

Sonronius dahlbomi nymph

© Peter Hillman ♦ 9th, 22nd & 30th June 2019 ♦ Local woodland path, Staffordshire ♦ Nikon D7200


26 thoughts on “Self Isolating

  1. Sometimes people exhibit the same behavior. I once knew a woman who lived in a small Texas town (population about 350) who occasionally shopped in a slightly larger town (population about 15,000) that was perhaps twenty miles away. Despite having lived for ninety years or so, she never had been to San Antonio, a hundred miles away. “Why should I go?” she’d say. “I have everything I need here.”

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  2. For insects to prefer living in a small, defined space is an interesting phenomenon. While some humans may be relishing the opportunity to spend time at home, others seem to find it a restricting experience. We all have to make the best of what we have.

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  3. Nice captures; I especially like the nymphs. I occasionally come across leafhoppers and the one I see most often when I do encounter them is the candy-striped or red-banded leafhopper. Their small size makes them hard to photograph unless you catch them at just the right spot on the plant. Their turquoise and red stripes makes the effort worth it though.

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    1. Your leafhoppers sound really interesting and especially colourful. They sure can be very difficult to photo because of their small size, and I have got stung on nettles a few times trying to get to them. Thank you, david 🙂

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      1. No, thank you for asking, Jill. I am still under cardioligist because of breathing difficulties and fatigue, believe it or not with this Coronavirus about. I had a virus back in October which developed into pericarditus (fluid around the heart which they had to drain) and pneumonia. I have still not recovered from it so I had MRI heart scan checking for possible constriction, and I am still waiting for results. It has been a waiting game, and it will only get worse now with the spread of Coronavirus.

        Liked by 2 people

      2. Sounds complicated. I will send positive thoughts that you get the results you want, recover and stay well. By the way I was unable to like or comment on the goldenrod grab spider on the rose as the post no longer existed. But I tried. You take care Pete and all will eventually be well.

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      3. I really appreciate that, Jill, thank you. Oh … I think I know what happened with Goldenrod. I have been tinkering with my pages and my site as a whole, and moved the blog page, so probably broke the link. I probably broke it all, come to think of it! Yikes! Yet it works from my wordpress site okay, it must be just how it gets to the reader.

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