Hummingbird Hawk-moth


Macroglossum stellatarum – I feel quite privileged to have been able to take these photographs of this splendid hawk-moth. I took them quite a few years ago with my first digital camera purchase back in the summer of 2005, and haven’t been able to capture one in flight and feeding since back then. A spectacular brightly coloured diurnal moth which can be seen sipping nectar in full sunlight with its extraordinary long proboscis. It looks and sounds like a hummingbird as it feeds from tubular flowers such as Red Valerian, Buddleia, Lilac, and the like.


Hummingbird Hawkmoth Macroglossum stellatarum


Hummingbird Hawkmoth Macroglossum stellatarum


Hummingbird Hawkmoth Macroglossum stellatarum


Copyright: Peter Hillman
Camera used: Sony Cybershot DSC-W1
Date taken: 21st August 2005
Place: Rear garden, Staffordshire


 

27 thoughts on “Hummingbird Hawk-moth

  1. Aren’t these creatures wonderful?! We see them very occasionally at our cottage.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. The only species I’ve ever seen is the white-lined hawk moth, which has a little pink to go with its white lines. I think they’re quite common north of Houston, and they may be more common here than I realize. They’re fantastic creatures!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Looks like an interesting little creature – I am sure this moth is hard to capture with a camera.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I was lucky back then with these shots as they move so fast and don’t always stay long. This one must of been hungry as he stayed longer than most.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Wonderful pictures! I always wanted to see one and last late summer I saw one up here on the 3rd floor, but only for a few seconds. It was looking for nectar, but there wasn’t much left. Nevertheless I was sooo happy πŸ™‚ I hope for a coming back!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. We’ve got hummingbird moths visiting our bee balm every year…hummingbirds too. They are a real challenge to photograph and you’ve done well with these.

    Liked by 1 person

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