Snow-in-summer

Snow in summer Cerastium tomentosum

Snow-in-summer (Cerastium tomentosum).

This was taken in the shade as the sun had moved around the garden this late afternoon. Trying out my new Sigma 18-300mm DC macro lens for the first time, and seeing what it can do. Will need to practice more to get the hang of it.

May 2018, rear garden, Staffordshire, England. Β© Pete Hillman

16 thoughts on “Snow-in-summer

    1. Thank you, Belinda πŸ™‚ Only came from Amazon later this evening, and some of the light was fading. Will give it more of a go tomorrow. Like a boy with a new toy, lol! πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

    1. That’s excatly why I got it, Ted, and mainly for when I am travelling as too many lens can become a stone around your neck at times. I still love my Sigma 105mm macro, though, but you can get a close-up filter for the 18-300 which gets you even closer for macro. πŸ™‚ I have the Nikon 70-300mm, and the new Sigma 18-300 appears to stand up to it magnificently well. Thank you, I sure will enjoy! πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

      1. One item of note on a lens of that range; focus on moving subjects. If a lens loses focus it must hunt to regain it. A lost focus at say 250, means the lens falls back to 18, and searches out to 300. Or until focus is acquired again.

        I most always shoot moving subjects. I have a Tamron (ugh) 18-400 walk around lens. It is very slow to regain focus. The good news…Sigma is much faster to focus, much faster. I only have the Tamron since it is the only lens with a range like that on the market. Mid range it is a good lens, and light weight. I hike a LOT and I’m heading for 70, light weight is good at my age. πŸ˜€

        Liked by 1 person

      2. The Tamron you have looks like a really good lens, and I did notice it when looking for reviews on my Sigma and other lenses. I don’t photo many moving objects, except for gulls maybe, and of course insects like bees on the macro scale which hardly ever keep still as they bumble from flower to flower πŸ™‚

        Like

      3. I have to say whilst out in the fields I spied a Grey Heron flying over ahead, and was quite amazed at how quickly it focused on the moving subject! It took me longer to switch the camera on and get the lens cap off!

        Liked by 1 person

  1. Nice shot, Pete. Sound like a great all-round lens to take on a walk on it’s own.

    (BTW I’ve got a shot of the same plant in full bloom in Melbourne’s RBG).

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Vicki πŸ™‚ That is what I was looking for to cut down on the load when on my holidays. I haven’t had Snow-in-summer here for a few years, and decided to replant some. I really love these flowers and the foliage, and they do attract the bees πŸ™‚ Nice to know you have them there, too πŸ™‚

      Like

  2. It’s interesting that it’s considered a ground cover, but that it’s part of the carnation family. I had wondered about the specific epithet, and see that it refers to its “felty” leaves. They do have that pretty, silvery-gray cast to them — it’s a lovely plant, and well photographed.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. This plant takes me back to my childhood when my folks grew it in a raised border so it trailed over the wall. Thank you, Linda πŸ™‚

      Like

Your thoughts ...

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.