Garden Pond – After The First Winter

Garden Pond

I created a small nature pond in my back garden towards the end of April last year, and after a good start, I wondered how it would fair through its first winter.

Marsh Marigold Caltha palustris

Most of the aquatic plants had died down, and the tiny underwater invertebrates had apparently gone to sleep. The only thing that appeared to have stayed awake and active was the Blanket Weed, stringy green algae which has filled out the pond. Now the warmer weather has arrived I have carefully removed some of this weed as I don’t want it to completely overrun the pond.

I am pleased to see the Marsh Marigold is budding and raising itself out of the water as can be seen in the above image, and below the Water Mint has spread and is coming into leaf.

The water has remained pretty clear, and I have seen some damselfly larvae sunning themselves on the rocks below the water’s surface. After resetting some larger rocks on the ponds perimeter, and clearing out some pond debris, I am pleased there is still life in it, and I will look forward to see how it progresses through the spring as the temperatures rise. Ducky, also appears to be quite pleased, too πŸ™‚

Garden Pond

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17 thoughts on “Garden Pond – After The First Winter

  1. That thick algae was such a problem in my pond. It would ensnare tadpoles, who would then drown. 😦
    I’m considering replacing my pond this year with a fountain and a smaller pool, as the utility co. has to excavate that very spot – not something I’m looking forward to – a garden disaster!

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    • Yes, very this and fibrous this algae. I have used a small net to remove some of it, and wound some around a garden cane, but I don’t want to go to made for fear of disturbing any litter critters settled down under there.

      Sorry about your pond. Mine is only a small pond, yet seems very active, so maybe you could start over again.

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    • Thank you, Sandy πŸ™‚ It is only a small pond, so is not too bad maintenance wise. I have decking overlooking it, and it is quite a pleasure to sit out in the sun and watch nature up close.

      Liked by 2 people

  2. How lucky you are to have a pond AND a backyard Pete. Keep us updated as the season progresses and each new sign of life appears in the water.

    (Having said how lucky you are, I keep forgetting how lucky I have been in life to have lived next to the Botanic Gardens, then the Yarra River and now Frogs Hollow Wetlands and several ponds/lakes/river only a few hundred feet away. It’s like my ‘backyard’ really is……Living with Nature).

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    • Thank you very much, Vicki πŸ™‚ It must have been wonderful with all that nature around you. I have wanted a pond for some years, but my garden is only small and I thought I would not be able to fit one in. But last year I decided to give it a shot and built but a small one. I was quite amazed how nature soon moved into claim it!

      I have been keeping a record of some of the life which have visited it and took up residence there, and you can see via this link if you wish to :

      https://petehillmansnaturephotography.wordpress.com/category/garden/garden-pond/

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